Category: Mitsubishi Technology

Hologram

Mitsubishi recently developed a new display system capable of projecting a 56-inch image that they can actually pass through. You heard right. This holographic technology introduces a completely unique display system that may have interesting implications in the auto industry should the brand choose to implement the technology.

According to Japan Today, the Mitsubishi Electric Corporation developed the Mitsubishi Floating Display that can be used for things like digital signage, amusements, and guide signs. Although some companies have developed holograph-like technologies, this system lets you actually pass through it and penetrate it.

“There have already been displays that can show an image above a table-like device,” said technology writer Naoki Tanaka. “And, in demonstrations, images displayed by those displays were touched and penetrated through by a hand. However, because of the table-like device right below the image, it was not possible for a human to walk through the image.”

The key to this system is its complex optical system. Images are displayed in front of a half mirror (beam splitter) in midair. That means that individuals can approach images, and possibly interact with videos and virtual reality systems. Although Mitsubishi Electric is a distinct entity from Mitsubishi Motors, the brand may explore innovative technologies sometime in the future. This projector technology is set to be available commercially by 2020.

Tell us at Don Robinson Mitsubishi how you would want to see this technology implemented into your favorite Mitsubishi model!

Forget about mechanized brakes, backup sensors, and even self-driving cars; Mitsubishi is stepping it up a notch with an actual robot employee at a couple of its Tokyo bank locations. Before completely automatic cars, will we get automatic people?

The humanoid robot is named Nao, and Nao speaks 19 languages. Thanks to camera eyes and microphone ears, Nao can both see and hear people, not only recognizing the meaning of the words but also analyzing their facial expressions.

Nao can even understand the subtle differences in tone of voice. So I wouldn’t take “that tone” with Nao, if I were you.

The first few of the Nao models are designed to test how effective the humanoid can be at branches, with Mitsubishi convinced that Nao can even handle tricky customers. If all goes well, the company will increase the Nao presence to most of their branches.

What do you think? Ready to argue with a Mitsubishi robot banker? Let us know at Don Robinson Mitsubishi your thoughts in the comments.

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