Category: Mitsubishi Technology

Mitsubishi engineers push to develop cutting-edge technology to improve performance, safety, and efficiency. Read about some of Mitsubishi’s milestones of innovation.

  • MiEV Technology: The Mitsubishi innovative Electronic Vehicle technology is the product of 40 years of engineering, creating a system to oversee and distribute power to the vehicle. The result of MiEV is a smooth acceleration experience and a fuel-efficient drive.
  • Active Stability and Traction Control: Active Stability and Traction Control uses sensors and the anti-lock brake system to ensure your safety on road, even in hazardous conditions. This feature is standard in the majority of Mitsubishi vehicles sold today.
  • INVECS Adaptive Shift Control: The INVECS Adaptive Shift Control technology learns how you tend to drive and modifies the behavior of the transmission to customize your commute.
  • MIVEC Engine Technology: MIVEC Engine Technology provides optimized timing of the valve to find a balance between fuel economy and power.
  • All-Wheel Control: By feeling the condition of the road for ice, snow, or other obstructions, the All-Wheel Control system automatically sends power to the wheels that have the most available traction.
  • Super All-Wheel Control: Super All-Wheel Control is a 2014 improvement of the All-Wheel Control system that lets drivers select from four driving modes: Normal, Lock, Snow, and AWC Eco.

Contact the sales associates at Don Robinson Mitsubishi for a test drive to check out some of these incredible technologies for yourself.

2018 Outlander Sport | Don Robinson Mitsubishi

 

Mitsubishi offers a range of innovative technologies, particularly its vaunted Super All Wheel Control (S-AWC). However, just what is Mitsubishi S-AWC?

This patented system appeared first on the Lancer Evolution in 2007, and it is a modified all-wheel control technology that regulates torque, wheel spin, and brake force to keep you in control.

According to Mitsubishi, S-AWC is a Vehicle Dynamics Control system that helps you maintain control around corners, as you change lanes, and especially on slippery surfaces. The Outlander, Lancer, and Eclipse Cross are some of the vehicles that come with this technology, and the latest versions even offer four different modes of operation. You can switch between AWC ECO, SNOW, NORMAL, and LOCK as you drive.

The AWC ECO feature adjusts torque under the front wheels when you’re driving in normal circumstances, a slight change that saves on gas. The SNOW feature is ideal for ice and snow, while the NORMAL has optimal control for everyday driving. Finally, the LOCK system is for going off-road, and it’s comparable to an advanced 4WD all-terrain system.

The S-AWC system pairs well with components like an Active Center Differential, Active Yaw Control, and Active Stability Control.

Using the latest computer technologies and combining them with performance engineering, Mitsubishi engineers have been able to create some of the best driving technologies around—including S-AWC. Come and check out all the vehicles in the Mitsubishi lineup that use this advanced system at Don Robinson Mitsubishi today.

Hologram

Mitsubishi recently developed a new display system capable of projecting a 56-inch image that they can actually pass through. You heard right. This holographic technology introduces a completely unique display system that may have interesting implications in the auto industry should the brand choose to implement the technology.

According to Japan Today, the Mitsubishi Electric Corporation developed the Mitsubishi Floating Display that can be used for things like digital signage, amusements, and guide signs. Although some companies have developed holograph-like technologies, this system lets you actually pass through it and penetrate it.

“There have already been displays that can show an image above a table-like device,” said technology writer Naoki Tanaka. “And, in demonstrations, images displayed by those displays were touched and penetrated through by a hand. However, because of the table-like device right below the image, it was not possible for a human to walk through the image.”

The key to this system is its complex optical system. Images are displayed in front of a half mirror (beam splitter) in midair. That means that individuals can approach images, and possibly interact with videos and virtual reality systems. Although Mitsubishi Electric is a distinct entity from Mitsubishi Motors, the brand may explore innovative technologies sometime in the future. This projector technology is set to be available commercially by 2020.

Tell us at Don Robinson Mitsubishi how you would want to see this technology implemented into your favorite Mitsubishi model!

Forget about mechanized brakes, backup sensors, and even self-driving cars; Mitsubishi is stepping it up a notch with an actual robot employee at a couple of its Tokyo bank locations. Before completely automatic cars, will we get automatic people?

The humanoid robot is named Nao, and Nao speaks 19 languages. Thanks to camera eyes and microphone ears, Nao can both see and hear people, not only recognizing the meaning of the words but also analyzing their facial expressions.

Nao can even understand the subtle differences in tone of voice. So I wouldn’t take “that tone” with Nao, if I were you.

The first few of the Nao models are designed to test how effective the humanoid can be at branches, with Mitsubishi convinced that Nao can even handle tricky customers. If all goes well, the company will increase the Nao presence to most of their branches.

What do you think? Ready to argue with a Mitsubishi robot banker? Let us know at Don Robinson Mitsubishi your thoughts in the comments.

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